Posts tagged ‘ecofrensex’

Walk on the Titanic

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this is what happen..when

Courtroom howlers

Courtroom howlers

These are from a book called “Disorder In The Court” and are things people said in court, word for word, taken down and now published by court reporters – who had the torment of staying calm while these exchanges were taking place.

Q: Are you sexually active?
A: No, I just lie there.

Q: What is your date of birth?
A: July fifteenth.
Q: What year?
A: Every year.

Q: What gear were you in at the moment of the impact?
A: Gucci sweats and Reeboks.

Q: This myasthenia gravis, does it affect your memory at all?
A: Yes.
Q: And in what ways does it affect your memory?
A: I forget.
Q: You forget. Can you give us an example of something that you’ve forgotten?

Q: How old is your son, the one living with you?
A: Thirty-eight or thirty-five, I can’t remember which.
Q: How long has he lived with you?
A: Forty-five years.

Q: What was the first thing your husband said to you when he woke up that morning?
A: He said, “Where am I, Cathy?”
Q: And why did that upset you?
A: My name is Susan.

Q: Do you know if your daughter has ever been involved in voodoo or the occult?
A: We both do.
Q: Voodoo?
A: We do.
Q: You do?
A: Yes, voodoo.

Q: Now doctor, isn’t it true that when a person dies in his sleep, he doesn’t know about it until the next morning?

Q: The youngest son, the twenty-year old, how old is he?

Q: Were you present when your picture was taken?

Q: So the date of conception (of the baby) was August 8th?
A: Yes.
Q: And what were you doing at that time?

Q: She had three children, right?
A: Yes.
Q: How many were boys?
A: None.
Q: Were there any girls?

Q: How was your first marriage terminated?
A: By death.
Q: And by whose death was it terminated?

Q: Can you describe the individual?
A: He was about medium height and had a beard.
Q: Was this a male, or a female?

Q: Is your appearance here this morning pursuant to a deposition notice which I sent to your attorney?
A: No, this is how I dress when I go to work.

Q: Doctor, how many autopsies have you performed on dead people?
A: All my autopsies are performed on dead people.

Q: All your responses must be oral, OK? What school did you go to?
A: Oral.

Q: Do you recall the time that you examined the body?
A: The autopsy started around 8:30 p.m.
Q: And Mr.. Dennington was dead at the time?
A: No, he was sitting on the table wondering why I was doing an autopsy.

Q: Are you qualified to give a urine sample?

Q: Doctor, before you performed the autopsy, did you check for a pulse?
A: No.
Q: Did you check for blood pressure?
A: No.
Q: Did you check for breathing?
A: No.
Q: So, then it is possible that the patient was alive when you began the autopsy?
A: No.
Q: How can you be so sure, Doctor?
A: Because his brain was sitting on my desk in a jar.
Q: But could the patient have still been alive, nevertheless?
A: Yes, it is possible that he could have been alive and practising law somewhere

A TIMELINE OF UNDERWEAR

A TIMELINE OF UNDERWEAR

By Tim Lambert

c 100 AD Roman men and women wear shorts called subligaculum. Women also wear a band of leather or cloth around their chest called a strophium or mamilare.

13th Century Men begin to wear linen shorts called braies. Women wear a nightie like garment called a shift or chemise under their dress. However women do not wear knickers.

1600 Many women wear a frame of wire or whalebone called a farthingale under their dress. The cheaper version was called a bum roll. It was a padded roll worn around the waist. Wealthy women wear silk stockings.

1800 Women begin to wear knickers for the first time. At first they are called drawers because they are drawn on.

1860s Some women begin to wear coloured drawers and petticoats although white is still popular.

1880s In Britain drawers for women are now called knickers and men’s underwear is called pants. Men also wear vests or sometimes combinations, pants and vest in one garment.

1900 Some women are so poor they have to make their knickers from sacks used to hold food like flour

1910 Knickers and stockings are first made of rayon

1913 The modern bra is invented by Mary Crosby who uses two handkerchiefs joined by a ribbon

1920s Knickers become shorter. They rise from the knee to the mid-calf.

1935 Y fronts are invented

1939 Nylon stockings are first made

1940s Fashionable women wear briefs. However in Britain clothes are rationed from 1941-1949. During World War II women sometimes make their knickers from parachute silk.

1959 Tights (pantyhose) are invented

1964 The wonderbra is invented

1968 The wonderbra is introduced to Britain

1974 The thong is invented

1990s Thongs become popular in Britain

http://www.localhistories.org/underweartime.html

When I need you by celine dion

Red makes men behave “like animals”

31 October 2008
Red makes men behave “like animals”
by Kate Melville

A new study by two University of Rochester psychologists adds color – literally and figuratively – to the age-old question of what attracts men to women. Through five experiments, Andrew Elliot and Daniela Niesta demonstrate that the color red makes men feel more amorous toward women. Most surprisingly, men are unaware of the role the color plays in their attraction.

Appearing in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, the research provides the first empirical support for society’s enduring love affair with red. From red-light districts to red hearts on Valentine’s Day, red has been tied to carnal passions and romantic love across cultures and millennia. But this study, said Elliot, is the only work to scientifically document the effects of color on behavior in the context of relationships.

“It’s only recently that psychologists and researchers in other disciplines have been looking closely and systematically at the relationship between color and behavior. Much is known about color physics and color physiology, but very little about color psychology,” said Elliot. “It’s fascinating to find that something as ubiquitous as color can be having an effect on our behavior without our awareness.”

Although this aphrodisiacal effect of red may be a product of societal conditioning alone, the authors argue that men’s response to red more likely stems from deeper biological roots. Research has shown that nonhuman male primates are particularly attracted to females displaying red. Female baboons and chimpanzees, for example, redden conspicuously when nearing ovulation, sending a clear sexual signal designed to attract males.

“Our research demonstrates a parallel in the way that human and nonhuman male primates respond to red,” say the researchers. “In doing so, our findings confirm what many women have long suspected and claimed – that men act like animals in the sexual realm. As much as men might like to think that they respond to women in a thoughtful, sophisticated manner, it appears that at least to some degree, their preferences and predilections are, in a word, primitive.”

To quantify the red effect, the study looked at men’s responses to photographs of women under a variety of color presentations. In one experiment, test subjects looked at a woman’s photo framed by a border of either red or white and answered a series of questions, such as: “How pretty do you think this person is?”

When using chromatic colors like green and blue, the colors were precisely equated in saturation and brightness levels, explained Niesta, so that the “test results could not be attributed to differences other than hue.”

In the final study, the shirt of the woman in the photograph, instead of the background, was digitally colored red or blue. In this experiment, men were queried not only about their attraction to the woman, but their intentions regarding dating. One question asked: “Imagine that you are going on a date with this person and have $100 in your wallet. How much money would you be willing to spend on your date?”

Under all of the conditions, the women shown framed by or wearing red were rated significantly more attractive and sexually desirable by men than the exact same women shown with other colors. The red effect extends only to males and only to perceptions of attractiveness. Red did not increase attractiveness ratings for females rating other females and red did not change how men rated the women in the photographs in terms of likeability, intelligence or kindness.

Although red enhances positive feelings in this study, earlier research suggests the meaning of a color depends on its context. For example, seeing red in competition situations, such as written examinations or sporting events, leads to worse performance. The current findings have clear implications for the dating game, the fashion industry, product design and marketing, say the researchers.

http://www.scienceagogo.com/news/20080930234527data_trunc_sys.shtml

Beautiful BUMs day